What is Tai Chi?

Literally translated Tai Chi means Supreme Ultimate Exercise

The most well-known aspect of the art is called the solo Form which is a series of slow, smooth relaxed exercises where control of the posture is of utmost importance.

The more accurate and precise the movements are performed enhance its health benefits.
The Tai Chi exercise naturally deepens the breathing, calming the mind and gently stimulating the whole system.

It is this precision  during the exercise which accounts for many of the health benefits.
Like Acupuncture Tai Chi’s aim is to balance the life force or Chi and cultivate good health and a calm mind.
It is used extensively in the Far East not only to maintain good health but also to support recovery from ill health in many hospitals.

In the west medical research studies has proven the many health benefits of regular practise of Tai Chi, please see here for more information.
The solo form is only one part of Tai Chi the others being, Qigong, Pushing Hands, Self defence and Tai Chi weapons used by advanced practitioners to develop their energy further.

We teach all of these parts of Tai Chi in our classes, except for the self defense, or combat form, which has its own seperate class. There are various styles of Tai Chi and the one we teach is called Yang Tai Chi.
The Yang style is characterised by long, smooth movements with are soothing for the mind and body.
Master Hine has been teaching this style for over 30 years in the UK. We also teach Bagua and Hsing Yi, sister arts to Tai Chi.

Bagua is based on the ancient Chinese Taoist I Ching or Book of Changes.

The book of changes teaches that everything has a cycle and is in constant change:

The constant twisting and turning thoroughly exercises your waist, lower back, shoulders and hips. But more than that all of your internal organs receive a thorough massaging, so you are exercised both inside and out.
The hips and legs are strengthened and stretched making this a very balanced routine, for example with Bagua.
Xingyi is oldest of the three internal arts, and is practised in straight lines, mimicking the marching of the convoy guards on the silk routes. It is, in fact, some 900 hundred years old, or so the legend goes. For more information see here.